Your brand is who you are, what you do, why you do it, and who you do it for. It’s your promise to your customers;
it represents what customers expect your company to deliver.

A clear, unified corporate identity can be critical to competitive strategy, It serves as a north star, providing
direction and purpose. It can also enhance the image of individual products, help firms recruit and retain
employees, and provide protection against reputational damage in times of trouble. Many firms, however, struggle
to articulate and communicate their brand.

Sometimes a sketch of a firm’s identity can be done quickly, and even be helpful. But developing a comprehensive
understanding of a firm’s brand identity usually takes much longer, involving many sessions and leadership and
teams throughout the organization. The process can happen faster, though, if the company already has strong core
values and other essential elements of identity.

Therefore, how the company wants to be perceived by customers and other external stakeholders depends on its
value proposition, outside relationships, and positioning.
A corporations identity is made up of nine interrelated components, by examining each one and how it relates to
the others, an organization can build a stronger brand.

External: value proposition- relationships- position.
External/ internal: expression- brand core- personality.
Internal: mission and vision- culture- competences.

 

However, corporate branding necessitates a different management approach. It requires greater emphasis on
factors internal to the organization, paying greater attention to the role of employees in the brand-building
process.

A company will have a brand, whether it take steps to design and implement one or not. That’s because a brand is
in large part how the world sees the company. Customers, leads and prospects, as well as vendors and competitors
all form an opinion of what the company is, what it does and how well it does it. They will all form perceptions of
the company’s brand’s values, personality, and reputation.

 

 

– (Harvard Business Review, 2019)

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